ARM Template Reference Now Available

If you’ve been tracking Microsoft’s Azure cloud offering over the past few years you’ve probably noticed that there have been a few (hundred) changes during that time period. And by hundred, I mean multiple hundreds. . .

One of those changes was to transition from the Azure Service Management interfaces to the Azure Resource Management template model. This methodology has made the development of complete environments through Infrastructure as Code significantly more manageable through resource groups using templates that can be spun up and torn down on demand.

Recently Microsoft released their Azure Resource Manager template reference which guides you from nothing to environment in a pretty rapid fashion. If you’re familiar with Infrastructure as Code using JSON notation then this will be incredibly familiar to you and you may even find yourself liking it.

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/azure-resource-manager-template-reference-now-available/

Windows Management Framework 4.0 Released

Just a heads up that the Windows Management Framework version 4.0 has been released.

If you remember the past year or so that it wasn’t until Service Pack 2 was released for SharePoint 2010 that you were able to use Windows Management Framework 3.0 with the application server. In similar fashion, version 4 is not compatible with a boat load of applications (Exchange 2013, SharePoint 2013, SharePoint 2010).

So before you get excited and run out and install it to start taking advantage of some of the improvements in Windows Remote Management, be mindful that it will break your applications.

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=40855

Uncertain as to when we’ll see fixes to allow for compatibility with all of these application servers…

Check out the snazzy System Requirements tab:
Windows Management Framework 4.0

Blocking the installation of SharePoint 2013…

Recently I came across a thread on SPYAM regarding whether it’s possible to block SharePoint 2013 installations using group policy or through the registry.

Sure enough it’s possible to use the SharePoint 2010 installation blocking technique for SharePoint 2013 with a minor modification. Rather than having the Registry Key be for 14.0, just modify it to be 15.0.

So the key that end up implementing either through Group Policy, Power Shell or Registry key setting is:

HKLMSOFTWAREPoliciesMicrosoftShared ToolsWeb Server Extensions15.0SharePoint

With a DWORD Value of ‘DisableInstall’ with a property value of 1.

Sure you can still install the pre-reqs for 2013, but when you attempt to install the actual SharePoint 2013 binary, this is what you end up with:

SharePoint2013-BlockInstall

Time to pick up that VOIP handset and call the administrator about the GPO that seems to be pushed to my server and why I should be allowed to be moved to another OU that has a different domain linked policy. 🙂

Docs: Upgrading to SharePoint Server 2010 v3 Released

Similar to other documents, Microsoft has released a second update this month pertaining to Upgrading to SharePoint 2010. Similar to other docs, no change log is included with the document – break out your compare documents to find out the differences.

The document is available in two flavours, doc and pdf and available here for download:

Upgrading to SharePoint 2010 – Version 3, Released 17 January 2001

Docs: Group Policy for Microsoft Office 2010 – Update v2

In case you downloaded the Group Policy for Microsoft Office 2010 earlier this month, Microsoft has updated the documentation, still available in your favorite three flavours of doc, pdf and xps.

Group Policy for Microsoft Office 2010 Version 2, released on 17 January 2011

Unfortunately a change log page is not included within the document, thereby preventing us from knowing exactly what changed.

SharePoint Products and Technologies Protocol Documentation Update

For those of you that are working with integrating SharePoint with other technologies or just plumb curious as to the interfaces and technical specifications to take into account while developing solutions, best check out the 186 MB of SharePoint Products and Technologies Protocol Documentation that was recently updated and re-released. The original documentation was released back in July 2010.

Quick access here:

Microsoft SharePoint Products and Technologies Protocol Documentation – (1/10/11 v1.11)

December 2010 Cumulative Updates for SharePoint

This one goes out to my friend and SharePoint colleague, Mark Rackley, also known to many of you as @MRackley. Gotta help my Dev friends that wonder at times why the underlying infrastructure doesn’t work properly – hopefully these bits will help.

Seem like you just got the good bits for the October 2010 Cumulative Update for SharePoint 2010? Just like that *snap* the December 2010 Cumulative Update is available.

The cumulative updates contain several fixes that go across the entirety of the platform from REST to Search to e-mail notifications that should be sent to task assignee’s.

Information Articles for December 2010 Cumulative Updates:

SharePoint Foundation Server 2010 – http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2459108
SharePoint Server 2010 – http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2459257
Project Server 2010 – http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2459258

Windows SharePoint Services v3 – http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2458606
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 – http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2458605

Full server downloads from the automated hotfix system available at:

SharePoint Foundation Server 2010 (x64 – 50.5 MB) – http://support.microsoft.com/hotfix/KBHotfix.aspx?kbnum=2459125
SharePoint Server 2010 (x64 – 325 MB) – http://support.microsoft.com/hotfix/KBHotfix.aspx?kbnum=2459257
Project Server 2010 (x64 – 330 MB) – http://support.microsoft.com/hotfix/KBHotfix.aspx?kbnum=2459258

Windows SharePoint Services v3 (x86 – 29.5 MB, x64 – 33.4 MB) – http://support.microsoft.com/hotfix/KBHotfix.aspx?kbnum=2458606
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2010 (x86 – 63.7 MB, x64 – 60.5 MB) http://support.microsoft.com/hotfix/KBHotfix.aspx?kbnum=2458605

Please be aware that there are some known issues with the SharePoint 2010 Cumulative Updates which may incur issues with some functionality, namely this:

Important notes about the cumulative update package

  • The Microsoft Office 2010 hotfixes are now multilingual. This cumulative update package contains updates for all languages.
  • This cumulative update package includes all the server component packages. Additionally, this cumulative update package updates only those components that are installed on the system.

Known issue 1
Consider the following scenario:

  • You install the Cumulative Update in this KB article on a SharePoint 2010 server.
  • You restart the server as it prompts you at the end of the installation.
  • You run the Psconfig.exe tool after the server restarts.

In this scenario, you see an error page when you access the Manage User Profile page in Central Administration.

Workaround

To work around this issue, follow these steps:

  1. Open the Central Administration page.
  2. Click Manage Services on the Server link.
  3. Find the User Profile Synchronization service, and then restart the service on the Server.aspx page.
  4. Perform iisreset after the service restarts successfully.

Known issue 2

2490381 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2490381/ ) You cannot create an AD DS synchronization connection that has multiple domains selected after you install the Cumulative Update in either KB 2459257 or KB 2459258

(Reference: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2459257)

As always, be sure to install cumulative updates in a testing environment prior to implementation on a production system.

Lastly remember that for SharePoint 2010, you only need to download the patch for the product you’re working with whereas with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 you’ll need both the WSS v3 patch and the MOSS 2007 patch.