Don’t lose your identity in the Cloud…

If you happen to log into your Office 365 Admin Portal on a regular basis good on you – though perhaps you can get most of your alerts through the Office 365 Admin app on your phone. If you do happen to log in though and you’re using Directory Synchronization by way of either Azure AD Connect or Microsoft Identity Manager, you hopefully don’t stumble upon a message like this on the Home page.

Screenshot 2018-03-24 23.31.07

If you do though, don’t worry, it’s not just a red highlighted bit of text, but it’s a link to your Directory Synchronization status (not DirSync is no longer around… AAD Connect is the way to go these days). What does it mean to your end users if Directory Synchronization is failing? Well, any change that they happen to make to their profile within your on-premises Active Directory won’t be synchronized with Azure Active Directory until the issue is resolved. Not a big deal – right? Well, just think if you changed your password on-premises, you’ll still be using your old password through Office 365.

If you happen to click the error message though you’ll come to a page with this displayed, you’ll note that you see something like this:

Screenshot 2018-03-24 23.28.11

If you’re not familiar with the above, it’s the Sync Status Health page. Typically if things are working good then you’ll see the last time that you sync’d successfully in addition to other pertinent information about your Office 365 tenant’s synchronization status as well as a less stormy picture of the cloud. ūüôā

In this case though, the troubleshooting tips are fairly helpful and link to https://support.office.com/en-us/article/fixing-problems-with-directory-synchronization-for-office-365-79c43023-5a47-45ae-8068-d8a26eee6bc2?ui=en-US&rs=en-US&ad=US

In this case, it just happens to be that I turned off the server that the Azure AD Connect tool was running on. Turning the server back and on and the error messages go away and identity changes begin to synchronize once more – life is good.

How do I remove my domain name from Office 365?

So you have a proof of concept Office 365 instance and you realize that you want to take things to Production, but you also realize that you want to keep your POC tenant up and oeprational. Caveat, you went through and applied your Domain Name to your tenant thorugh another registrar.  How do you get your domain back?

Well, it’s not as difficult as you might think. ¬†Simply wander into the Office 365 Admin Portal over at¬†https://portal.office.com/adminportal/

Under the “Setup” section of the Admin Center, you should see “Domains“. That will show you what domains you currently have associated with your Office 365 Tenant.

Screenshot 2018-03-25 21.32.07.pngIn my case I’ve got a custom domain, “potatoe.cloud” associated with my Office 365 tenant but still have my “onmicrosoft.com” domain as the default.

Step one to removing a domain is setting another domain as default. It’s pretty quick and easy, click on the other domain (in this case spsvabeach.onmicrosoft.com) and click “Set as Default.”

Next, within potatoe.cloud, I need to click on “Remove.” This should be simple enough.

Screenshot 2018-03-25 21.34.44.png

Crikey! What’s this message at the bottom yammering about being enabled in the region? So essentially, I get to write a quick PowerShell script using some of the Azure AD components available over at the PowerShell Gallery –¬†https://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/MSOnline/1.1.166.0

The gist of the script was running get-msoluser and feeding that to an array. From there looping through and modifying the UserPrincipalName’s domain name. Required a little more work than expected but in the end, worked quite nicely.

If you’ve only got a few users, probably easy enough to make this change through the Office 365 Admin UI. If you’ve got more than a few, PowerShell is your friend – working with arrays and foreach clauses to filter out the users you need to update to the “onmicrosoft.com” domain or another domain you’ve established and working.

Screenshot 2018-03-25 22.57.27

After you get below a certain number of users (unknown what that is) with the non-offending domain remaining in the UPN, you can delete the domain from the tenant.

From there you can change your DNS settings back within your DNS registrar to continue making use of the domain or setting it up on your new Office 365 tenant that you’re actually switching over to use for production.

Nevertheless, be sure to try this all out in a test tenant and be mindful that if you’ve got a provider hosted app that’s looking for a specific domain name associated with a user and it’s changed, the user’s access may also have been changed with it. This is similar to if you have an on-premises application and you modify the user’s User Principal Name on-premises – applications that used to rely on that begin to break.

Bottom line – TEST! TEST! TEST!

After you’ve worked out the kinks, you should be good to go! Best of luck!

 

Azure: Setting up a custom domain for Office 365 by way of Azure Active Directory

If you’re like me, sometimes you like to do things a little more efficiently and elegantly through PowerShell or through the Azure portal when it deals with the underlying infrastructure that’s associated with an Office 365 tenant. If you’re using Office 365 you’ve established a tenant with a .onmicrosoft.com name. ¬†Reminder PSA: You can’t change your tenant name after you’ve created it – at least not right now. ¬†But you can mask it using custom DNS names.

If you’re a little leery of Azure, then perhaps this will help to peel back the onion and bring tears of happiness to your face.

Step 0 – realize what you’re doing ūüôā and also that you probably want to make certain that you have permission to use the domain name that you’re setting up on the Office 365 / Azure instance that you’re going to perform these configuration changes on. Note that if you’re using a domain name already for something else that it might be wise to create a subdomain to tinker with rather than making “adjustments” to the main domain that you’ve got (e.g. something.danusher.com rather than danusher.com).

Step 1 – Head on over to your Office 365 admin portal (https://portal.office.com/adminportal/) and go to the bottom left corner to expand the “Admin Centers” section and click on “Azure Active Directory” (https://aad.portal.azure.com/binarybrewery.onmicrosoft.com). This will launch you to your Azure Active Directory admin center within Azure (alternatively, you can go to portal.azure.com and click on Azure Active Directory from the left most blade to open these settings).

Step 2 – Expand “Azure Active Directory” from the left most blade and then select “Custom domain names” from the blade that appears. This will list out the default tenant name that you have with your Office 365 tenant that was built out with your tenant when it was provisioned.

Screenshot 2018-03-27 21.52.54.png

Step 3 – Add a custom domain by typing in the name of the domain and then determining if you want to use a TXT record or an MX record to verify that you own the domain. If you’re not familiar with how to edit your TXT or MX records, Microsoft has some handy documentation on this over on the Office 365 support documents –¬†https://support.office.com/en-us/article/gather-the-information-you-need-to-create-office-365-dns-records-77f90d4a-dc7f-4f09-8972-c1b03ea85a67

Screenshot 2018-03-27 21.57.20.png

Step 4 РWait a while. Or as Spence would say while provisioning your User Profile Application, get a cuppa coffee.  DNS sometimes can take a while to provision.

Screenshot 2018-03-27 21.58.58.png

Sadly there are no exciting fireworks through the Azure Portal when you verify ownership of a domain.Screenshot 2018-03-27 22.31.19.png

Just a quick toast that briefly appears in the upper right hand corner of the Azure Portal.

Step 5 – Determine whether you just want to setup Azure AD Connect to get started with Directory and Password Synchronization, or go back to the Office 365 portal and setup the remaining DNS entries to be able to fully recognize the capabilities of Office 365. Nevertheless, you’ll see this screen within Azure upon completion of domain verification.

Screenshot 2018-03-27 22.14.05.png

Back in the Office 365 Admin Center however, you’ll notice that the domain says that it’s still being setup.

Screenshot 2018-03-27 22.34.09.pngStep 6 – Complete the setup of the domain by clicking on the line item associated with the domain name that has been verified by Microsoft Azure.

If I point my name servers from this domain through my registrar to be managed by Microsoft’s name servers, a lot of things just go away as Microsoft manages the domain for me at that point. If I however want to perform these configurations on my own as I have a complex DNS environment, I can do so by adding the values similar to these (fairly standard where you simply replace “potatoe-cloud” with your DNS name)word:

screenshot-2018-03-27-22-35-13.png

After you’ve updated your DNS within your registrar, you’ll see something like this if you happen to have an incorrect record…

Screenshot 2018-03-27 22.48.11.png

In my case I accidentally had an extra character in there – simple cut and paste error. ūüėź

After making my corrections and verifying settings I received a nice note that all was configured and ready to go.

Screenshot 2018-03-27 22.54.53.png

From there, any new user I create within Office 365 will make use of the @potatoe.cloud domain name rather than the Tenant name.

Congrats on having your Office 365 email accounts now masked as well as user login’s. I’d recommend learning how to setup and use Azure AD Connect so that you’re able to move forward with having your domain identities provisioned with Office 365 / Azure Active Directory to enhance your end user’s experience.

Remember – DNS isn’t that difficult. But it’s easy to mess up and also then make things more difficult.

Office 365: Managing your users through PowerShell

If you’re like me, then you tend to find yourself wanting to automate as much as possible, or at least be able to work with sets of data in a way that quickly allows you to get to the root of an issue rather than clicking through endless screens of information.

In case you were curious, Office 365 makes use of Azure Active Directory behind the scenes for user managment. As Azure Active Directory is an enterprise resource for identity management for cloud hosted applications, Microsoft has gone to great length to create several interfaces to it. Granted, I could just use a REST call through the Microsoft Graph API to create or delete a user through a POST command, but I can also use PowerShell from a Windows based device.

For user management, our first step is to download the appropriate PowerShell Module.  This can be done simply by installing the module through PowerShell running

install-module -name azuread

This will install the PowerShell module specifically for Azure AD and allow you to manage your users. From there before you can make any changes to your user base you’ll need to authenticate. An easy way to do this is as follows:

$creds = get-credential -credential
connect-azure-ad -credential $creds

From there you can parse your users and make modifications to your hearts desire. Running “Get-AzureADUser” enumerates all user objects. ¬†Load it into an array and work with the users as you wish.

Nevertheless, for more on this topic, check out the Microsoft Support docs over at:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/office365/enterprise/powershell/connect-to-office-365-powershell

https://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/AzureAD/2.0.1.3

Office 365: How to become an Office Insider

Microsoft continues to provide iterative changes to the Microsoft Office productivity suite. At one point in time Microsoft was deploying changes on a very frequent basis. While this was helpful for many users that were excited to see new bits flowing to their computing desktops on a regular basis, the amount of change fatigue became overwhelming for some users. As such, Microsoft modified the way that updates are pushed to Office users through Office 365.  For those users however that still wanted to be on the bleeding edge with a few builds per month, Microsoft provides the Office Insiders program.

To learn more about how to have the latest and greatest capabilities on your desktop you can read up more about it here –¬†https://products.office.com/en-us/office-insider?tab=Windows-Desktop. Be mindful that this link is for consumers and not enterprise users. To make these modifications to Enterprise users though requires using the Office Deployment Tools for 2016.

More on this topic about Enterprise users is available here –¬†https://support.office.com/en-us/article/how-office-365-commercial-customers-can-get-early-access-to-new-office-2016-features-4dd8ba40-73c0-4468-b778-c7b744d03ead

If you need to revert back to a more stable build it’s merely a matter of changing the channel that you’re locked into by way of running the Office Deployment Tools once more. Keep on keepin’ on!

Favorite Podcasts… 2017 List

It’s interesting to look back at the past year and realize that I haven’t really been listening to all that many podcasts – whether professionally or personally. There are a few that are epic that should be on everyone’s queues to include:

There are several others out there but the above are the ones you’ll probably find me listening to. Maybe.

And maybe at some point when life slows down we’ll have Brewery.fm come back to life… http://www.brewery.fm

Happy casting!

Office 365 Group Management and Auto-Expiration Public Preview

If you’ve been working with Microsoft SharePoint Products and Technologies, you probably remember a utility that was made available as a part of SharePoint Server 2003 to automatically delete old site collections that hadn’t been worked with in a while. This was an incredibly helpful utility for system administrators that were watching their SharePoint systems grow virally with the use of Self Service Site Collection creation.

If you’re not familiar with Self Service Site Collection Creation, it’s probably because it was removed from the SharePoint Products and Technologies and then brought back. Self Service Site Collection creation was incredibly beneficial to when users needed to get something up and running as quickly as possible but typically meant that users were creating site collections that may or may not have necessarily fit within the taxonomy of sites that were being implemented by their organization. What does that mean? Well, in some instances duplicative sites and site collections that were owned by different individuals that perhaps weren’t knowledgeable of one another were created, nor did they always find out that the other site / site collection existed since SharePoint Search follows the permissions model and trims out things that you don’t have access to see.

With Office 365’s SharePoint Online, site collection followed a similar life cycle where only certain individuals (SharePoint Service Administraotrs) had the ability to create them. This helped to limit the sprawl of site collections and knowledge but in some instances caused end users to use other Rogue IT services as they found the process for creating a new site to be cumbersome.

Enter in Office 365 Groups and the ability for end users to quickly stand up a collaboration group without the need of an approval from an IT Manager or someone concerned with site taxonomy. ¬†This effectively allows end users to provision a document library, a OneNote notebook, a calendar and a running history of messages that have been sent to the group. Sure it’s possible for the overarching administrator to turn this capability off (Groups) but the question then becomes, “Do you want to limit what your users can do with this Software as a Service platform and limit their ability to collaborate?” That’s a question that I know I comes up regularly – primarily when it comes to governance.

Back with SharePoint Server 2003 the added ability to have a script run and determine when a site collection was last modified which gave them the ability to then send an email to the site collection owner asking them if they were still using the site. Alternatively it was possible to just have the script watch and if it didn’t see a change over a certain period the site collection would be deleted. ¬†Pretty handy – this actually was introduced with Office 365 in OneDrive for Business service for when a user’s license was removed for Office 365 (14 days later their OneDrive for Business went away). Fortunately Microsoft has worked on the tooling for the OneDrive for Business capability to allow a little more flexibility as to how this now works.

In similar fashion the Microsoft Office 365 Groups has a capability announced recently to allow for a similar function of a “soft delete” with a 30 day window to get an Office 365 Group back. The messages that this will send seem to be a bit friendlier based on the blog post from the Enterprise Mobility and Security Blog‘s article “Azure AD Automated Expiration for Office 365 Groups in Public Preview“.

Personally I see this as a great capability but also realize that there will be some gotchas. Specifically in that when a Group is created, an Exchange Distribution list is created. This is helpful since you’re able to have message traffic sent to this address. However if you think about the use case where a Group is deleted and the users fail to realize that the e-mail address that they received notifications on now no longer exists, there may be problems for end users.

Additionally it should be noted per the configuration documentation¬†that an Azure AD Premium license is required to implement Office 365 Group Expiration – if you don’t have these they’re available at a per user cost and have several benefits in addition to this.

All in all, definitely an exciting feature and functionality but wondering how things will work for organizations where end users are truly business users that don’t quite understand all the components of an Office 365 Group or what the information lifecycle truly is…