Azure: Setting up a custom domain for Office 365 by way of Azure Active Directory

If you’re like me, sometimes you like to do things a little more efficiently and elegantly through PowerShell or through the Azure portal when it deals with the underlying infrastructure that’s associated with an Office 365 tenant. If you’re using Office 365 you’ve established a tenant with a .onmicrosoft.com name.  Reminder PSA: You can’t change your tenant name after you’ve created it – at least not right now.  But you can mask it using custom DNS names.

If you’re a little leery of Azure, then perhaps this will help to peel back the onion and bring tears of happiness to your face.

Step 0 – realize what you’re doing 🙂 and also that you probably want to make certain that you have permission to use the domain name that you’re setting up on the Office 365 / Azure instance that you’re going to perform these configuration changes on. Note that if you’re using a domain name already for something else that it might be wise to create a subdomain to tinker with rather than making “adjustments” to the main domain that you’ve got (e.g. something.danusher.com rather than danusher.com).

Step 1 – Head on over to your Office 365 admin portal (https://portal.office.com/adminportal/) and go to the bottom left corner to expand the “Admin Centers” section and click on “Azure Active Directory” (https://aad.portal.azure.com/binarybrewery.onmicrosoft.com). This will launch you to your Azure Active Directory admin center within Azure (alternatively, you can go to portal.azure.com and click on Azure Active Directory from the left most blade to open these settings).

Step 2 – Expand “Azure Active Directory” from the left most blade and then select “Custom domain names” from the blade that appears. This will list out the default tenant name that you have with your Office 365 tenant that was built out with your tenant when it was provisioned.

Screenshot 2018-03-27 21.52.54.png

Step 3 – Add a custom domain by typing in the name of the domain and then determining if you want to use a TXT record or an MX record to verify that you own the domain. If you’re not familiar with how to edit your TXT or MX records, Microsoft has some handy documentation on this over on the Office 365 support documents – https://support.office.com/en-us/article/gather-the-information-you-need-to-create-office-365-dns-records-77f90d4a-dc7f-4f09-8972-c1b03ea85a67

Screenshot 2018-03-27 21.57.20.png

Step 4 – Wait a while. Or as Spence would say while provisioning your User Profile Application, get a cuppa coffee.  DNS sometimes can take a while to provision.

Screenshot 2018-03-27 21.58.58.png

Sadly there are no exciting fireworks through the Azure Portal when you verify ownership of a domain.Screenshot 2018-03-27 22.31.19.png

Just a quick toast that briefly appears in the upper right hand corner of the Azure Portal.

Step 5 – Determine whether you just want to setup Azure AD Connect to get started with Directory and Password Synchronization, or go back to the Office 365 portal and setup the remaining DNS entries to be able to fully recognize the capabilities of Office 365. Nevertheless, you’ll see this screen within Azure upon completion of domain verification.

Screenshot 2018-03-27 22.14.05.png

Back in the Office 365 Admin Center however, you’ll notice that the domain says that it’s still being setup.

Screenshot 2018-03-27 22.34.09.pngStep 6 – Complete the setup of the domain by clicking on the line item associated with the domain name that has been verified by Microsoft Azure.

If I point my name servers from this domain through my registrar to be managed by Microsoft’s name servers, a lot of things just go away as Microsoft manages the domain for me at that point. If I however want to perform these configurations on my own as I have a complex DNS environment, I can do so by adding the values similar to these (fairly standard where you simply replace “potatoe-cloud” with your DNS name)word:

screenshot-2018-03-27-22-35-13.png

After you’ve updated your DNS within your registrar, you’ll see something like this if you happen to have an incorrect record…

Screenshot 2018-03-27 22.48.11.png

In my case I accidentally had an extra character in there – simple cut and paste error. 😐

After making my corrections and verifying settings I received a nice note that all was configured and ready to go.

Screenshot 2018-03-27 22.54.53.png

From there, any new user I create within Office 365 will make use of the @potatoe.cloud domain name rather than the Tenant name.

Congrats on having your Office 365 email accounts now masked as well as user login’s. I’d recommend learning how to setup and use Azure AD Connect so that you’re able to move forward with having your domain identities provisioned with Office 365 / Azure Active Directory to enhance your end user’s experience.

Remember – DNS isn’t that difficult. But it’s easy to mess up and also then make things more difficult.

Security and Compliance with Office 365

If you’ve signed up for Office 365 and kicking the tires? Consider checking some of the capabilities that you get with the Security and Compliance Portal within Office 365.  How do you get there? If you head over to https://protection.office.com you’ll be prompted to log in with your Work ID.  Once you’re in you’ll be able to configure components of your tenant for data loss prevention in addition to many additional capabilities.

For a quick overview of capabilities, head on over to the overview available here:

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/overview-of-security-and-compliance-in-office-365-dcb83b2c-ac66-4ced-925d-50eb9698a0b2

Office 365: Managing your users through PowerShell

If you’re like me, then you tend to find yourself wanting to automate as much as possible, or at least be able to work with sets of data in a way that quickly allows you to get to the root of an issue rather than clicking through endless screens of information.

In case you were curious, Office 365 makes use of Azure Active Directory behind the scenes for user managment. As Azure Active Directory is an enterprise resource for identity management for cloud hosted applications, Microsoft has gone to great length to create several interfaces to it. Granted, I could just use a REST call through the Microsoft Graph API to create or delete a user through a POST command, but I can also use PowerShell from a Windows based device.

For user management, our first step is to download the appropriate PowerShell Module.  This can be done simply by installing the module through PowerShell running

install-module -name azuread

This will install the PowerShell module specifically for Azure AD and allow you to manage your users. From there before you can make any changes to your user base you’ll need to authenticate. An easy way to do this is as follows:

$creds = get-credential -credential
connect-azure-ad -credential $creds

From there you can parse your users and make modifications to your hearts desire. Running “Get-AzureADUser” enumerates all user objects.  Load it into an array and work with the users as you wish.

Nevertheless, for more on this topic, check out the Microsoft Support docs over at:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/office365/enterprise/powershell/connect-to-office-365-powershell

https://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/AzureAD/2.0.1.3

Office 365: How to become an Office Insider

Microsoft continues to provide iterative changes to the Microsoft Office productivity suite. At one point in time Microsoft was deploying changes on a very frequent basis. While this was helpful for many users that were excited to see new bits flowing to their computing desktops on a regular basis, the amount of change fatigue became overwhelming for some users. As such, Microsoft modified the way that updates are pushed to Office users through Office 365.  For those users however that still wanted to be on the bleeding edge with a few builds per month, Microsoft provides the Office Insiders program.

To learn more about how to have the latest and greatest capabilities on your desktop you can read up more about it here – https://products.office.com/en-us/office-insider?tab=Windows-Desktop. Be mindful that this link is for consumers and not enterprise users. To make these modifications to Enterprise users though requires using the Office Deployment Tools for 2016.

More on this topic about Enterprise users is available here – https://support.office.com/en-us/article/how-office-365-commercial-customers-can-get-early-access-to-new-office-2016-features-4dd8ba40-73c0-4468-b778-c7b744d03ead

If you need to revert back to a more stable build it’s merely a matter of changing the channel that you’re locked into by way of running the Office Deployment Tools once more. Keep on keepin’ on!

Don’t turn into a pumpkin because of DirSync with your Office 365 system

I feel like I may have already mentioned this on the Twitter, but I feel like I need to put out a reminder PSA for folks that perhaps were asleep at the terminal or looking at their iPhone playing Pokemon Go… DirSync and AzureAD Sync Service will no longer connect as of 1 January 2018. Only AzureAD Connect will actually be able to connect to AzureAD to allow for imports of projected identities from your on-premises Active Directory or other LDAP based system.

You have been informed.

Why would I be using DirSync you might ask yourself? The primary reason being so that you’ve got all of your users’ identities and attribute information showing up properly within Office 365 (or within other applications that you’re hosting within Azure and need an identity source to pull from). Where do these user identities show up you might ask yourself? Within any contact card or anything that tracks a user.

Moving on… About a year ago, in April 2016, Microsoft deprecated DirSync and Azure AD Sync Services in favor of AzureAD Connect. They did this in a blog post. Some people may have missed it. Others put a sticky note in their cubical and then forgot it when another sticky note was placed on top of it reminding them to renew an SSL certificate.

If you’re not familiar with AzureAD Connect, you probably haven’t logged into your Azure portal (oh, by the way, it’s no longer manage.windowsazure.com, but rather it’s portal.azure.com) or you haven’t logged into the Admin terminal of your Office 365 portal to check on your Directory Synchronization status. Regardless, the time has come to go and figure out what you’re going to do so that your directory synchronization with AzureAD doesn’t go offline and break because of lack of upgrading to what is supported.

How do you go about upgrading to AzureAD Connect? RTM… or read the manual for those that aren’t familiar with acronyms.

Where do I find the manual though?

I’m glad you asked… as a typical search using your favorite search engine probably wouldn’t bring up the results until you clicked on the Search button. . .

Okay, so seriously, where’s the guidance for upgrading?

Check it out here https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/connect/active-directory-aadconnect-dirsync-deprecated.

Alternatively, Microsoft has additional documentation as a part of the AzureAD Connect installation documentation on how to upgrade over here –

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/connect/active-directory-aadconnect-dirsync-upgrade-get-started

All in all, it’s pretty simple to upgrade to your basic environments. If you have additional complex rule sets for performing combinations of actions while performing a projection into AzureAD from your on-premises AD, you’ll want to go in and figure out what they are within the MIIS Client so that you can recreate them or validate them within AzureAD Connect.

Good luck and hope that you’re able to make the deadline of midnight on the 31st of December as we ring in the new year!

Favorite Podcasts… 2017 List

It’s interesting to look back at the past year and realize that I haven’t really been listening to all that many podcasts – whether professionally or personally. There are a few that are epic that should be on everyone’s queues to include:

There are several others out there but the above are the ones you’ll probably find me listening to. Maybe.

And maybe at some point when life slows down we’ll have Brewery.fm come back to life… http://www.brewery.fm

Happy casting!

Azure’s Access Control Services Retiring

If you’ve been working with Azure for a while you may have come across a need to make use of Azure’s Access Control Services. This service offering or capability effectively allowed developers to create something that was hosted on Azure but have authentication and authorization to be completed performed outside of the application that a developer was building.

In many cases, developers that were looking to integrate with services like Facebook, Twitter, or another Active Directory would make use of ACS to handle the authentication and authorization and allow the developer to focus on what they were developing within their App. This was great in that it was effectively performing a lot of heavy lifting without a lot of code.

As Azure is continuing to evolve, change happens and in this case we see Access Control Services entering a deprecated state where it will no longer be support as of November 7, 2018. What’s all this mean to you? Perhaps nothing if you’re not using ACS. If you are however using ACS, it’s still fully operational, but similar to the Death Star, in the near future it will cease to exist.

More about this activity is available here on the Microsoft Azure Blog – https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/time-to-migrate-off-access-control-service/

If however you say to yourself, “I’ve been using ACS for a while and my app relies upon it heavily…” Fear not, there’s a published migration path that you can make use of… you can check it out here – https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/develop/active-directory-acs-migration

Nonetheless, consider yourself informed when you’re working with a client or with your fellow developers that you’ll need to consider how to begin building a transition plan to make use of something like Azure Active Directory or another offering of Azure’s per the migration guidance aforementioned. Happy developing!