DNS Flush…

So if you’re running into an issue where you need to flush DNS on your machine, there are a couple ways to do so… the two most common ways for me at least (long live the command line interface!) are to either pop open a run dialog in elevated permissions mode on a Windows box or open up a term shell on OSX.

For Windows, open an elevated permissions run dialog and then type:

ipconfig /flushdns

For Mac OSX, open a term shell and then type:

sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

Happy flushing and hope that your DNS records start resolving soon.

EC2 Tips for Windows users…

So I won’t claim to be an MCSE or someone that develops custom driver code when for some reason a newly installed components unsigned driver apparently doesn’t work and without it I won’t be able to experience true gigabit Ethernet throughput… but I do know a thing or two about scripting and API hacking.

Tip #1 – Download ElasticFox plugin for Mozilla Firefox

Tip #2 – Read through the ElasticFox Getting Started Guide

Tip #3 – Amazon Web Services EC2 Getting Started Guide

Tip #4 – Re-read Amazon Web Services EC2 Getting Started Guide

So as for me, I hit a road block until I realized that the API tools actually needed to be run from the host client that I was working from to make calls to the EC2 Cloud to perform any actions on the actual VM sitting in the cloud.

Essentially, what that means is that the API tools available here, are installed on your local machine. The path statements are set on your local machine and then the API tools can be used for simple things such as creating EBS or any other functionality of ElasticFox, but from the command line.

You are now free to roam the clouds… 🙂

Now Playing: Rory Stewart – The Places in Between (Unabridged)