Categories
Azure Cloud SharePoint

Azure Shared Disks are coming!!!

Do you still have a need or desire to continue to run your SharePoint environment in an on-premises data center so that you can have them luxury of Always On Availability Groups with SQL Server? Well… now you can really take that workload to the cloud (with some minor caveats) once Microsoft fully goes GA with the Azure Shared Disks server.

https://azure.microsoft.com/blog/announcing-the-preview-of-azure-shared-disks-for-clustered-applications/

If you’re thinking to yourself, isn’t this just the next revision of Azure Files? Nope, that makes use of SMB and NFS protocols for accessing disk – akin to your favorite file share or iSCSI device. This is effectively zoning disk and making it available to your operating system as a logical volume that can be accessed by your server.

So if you want to create a volume that’s a part of a clustered file share, look no further, we have a “better” solution for you now… the real question of course is what the performance will look like and whether or not it will be able to keep up… I’m pretty certain that this will be something that will become the de facto standard for architects and IT Pros as they begin to set something up in the cloud.

Categories
Azure

Azure: Public Preview of Serial Console

I have to say that this is crazy that Microsoft Azure now supports a Serial Console for Virtual Machines (at least in Public Preview).  Check out the blog entry over here – https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/azure-serial-console/

I decided to give it a little try to see more and it works like a champ. Very cool to see this capability coming to light as it’s been something that I know I’ve been looking for some time to have available when a VM wasn’t coming back up slower than I would have assumed it would. Well done folks!

Check out the announcement yonder on the Azure blog – https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/virtual-machine-serial-console-access/

Categories
Community Podcast

Favorite Podcasts… 2017 List

It’s interesting to look back at the past year and realize that I haven’t really been listening to all that many podcasts – whether professionally or personally. There are a few that are epic that should be on everyone’s queues to include:

There are several others out there but the above are the ones you’ll probably find me listening to. Maybe.

And maybe at some point when life slows down we’ll have Brewery.fm come back to life… http://www.brewery.fm

Happy casting!

Categories
Azure

Azure’s Access Control Services Retiring

If you’ve been working with Azure for a while you may have come across a need to make use of Azure’s Access Control Services. This service offering or capability effectively allowed developers to create something that was hosted on Azure but have authentication and authorization to be completed performed outside of the application that a developer was building.

In many cases, developers that were looking to integrate with services like Facebook, Twitter, or another Active Directory would make use of ACS to handle the authentication and authorization and allow the developer to focus on what they were developing within their App. This was great in that it was effectively performing a lot of heavy lifting without a lot of code.

As Azure is continuing to evolve, change happens and in this case we see Access Control Services entering a deprecated state where it will no longer be support as of November 7, 2018. What’s all this mean to you? Perhaps nothing if you’re not using ACS. If you are however using ACS, it’s still fully operational, but similar to the Death Star, in the near future it will cease to exist.

More about this activity is available here on the Microsoft Azure Blog – https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/time-to-migrate-off-access-control-service/

If however you say to yourself, “I’ve been using ACS for a while and my app relies upon it heavily…” Fear not, there’s a published migration path that you can make use of… you can check it out here – https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/develop/active-directory-acs-migration

Nonetheless, consider yourself informed when you’re working with a client or with your fellow developers that you’ll need to consider how to begin building a transition plan to make use of something like Azure Active Directory or another offering of Azure’s per the migration guidance aforementioned. Happy developing!

Categories
Azure Cloud Office 365 Office 365

Office 365 Group Management and Auto-Expiration Public Preview

If you’ve been working with Microsoft SharePoint Products and Technologies, you probably remember a utility that was made available as a part of SharePoint Server 2003 to automatically delete old site collections that hadn’t been worked with in a while. This was an incredibly helpful utility for system administrators that were watching their SharePoint systems grow virally with the use of Self Service Site Collection creation.

If you’re not familiar with Self Service Site Collection Creation, it’s probably because it was removed from the SharePoint Products and Technologies and then brought back. Self Service Site Collection creation was incredibly beneficial to when users needed to get something up and running as quickly as possible but typically meant that users were creating site collections that may or may not have necessarily fit within the taxonomy of sites that were being implemented by their organization. What does that mean? Well, in some instances duplicative sites and site collections that were owned by different individuals that perhaps weren’t knowledgeable of one another were created, nor did they always find out that the other site / site collection existed since SharePoint Search follows the permissions model and trims out things that you don’t have access to see.

With Office 365’s SharePoint Online, site collection followed a similar life cycle where only certain individuals (SharePoint Service Administraotrs) had the ability to create them. This helped to limit the sprawl of site collections and knowledge but in some instances caused end users to use other Rogue IT services as they found the process for creating a new site to be cumbersome.

Enter in Office 365 Groups and the ability for end users to quickly stand up a collaboration group without the need of an approval from an IT Manager or someone concerned with site taxonomy.  This effectively allows end users to provision a document library, a OneNote notebook, a calendar and a running history of messages that have been sent to the group. Sure it’s possible for the overarching administrator to turn this capability off (Groups) but the question then becomes, “Do you want to limit what your users can do with this Software as a Service platform and limit their ability to collaborate?” That’s a question that I know I comes up regularly – primarily when it comes to governance.

Back with SharePoint Server 2003 the added ability to have a script run and determine when a site collection was last modified which gave them the ability to then send an email to the site collection owner asking them if they were still using the site. Alternatively it was possible to just have the script watch and if it didn’t see a change over a certain period the site collection would be deleted.  Pretty handy – this actually was introduced with Office 365 in OneDrive for Business service for when a user’s license was removed for Office 365 (14 days later their OneDrive for Business went away). Fortunately Microsoft has worked on the tooling for the OneDrive for Business capability to allow a little more flexibility as to how this now works.

In similar fashion the Microsoft Office 365 Groups has a capability announced recently to allow for a similar function of a “soft delete” with a 30 day window to get an Office 365 Group back. The messages that this will send seem to be a bit friendlier based on the blog post from the Enterprise Mobility and Security Blog‘s article “Azure AD Automated Expiration for Office 365 Groups in Public Preview“.

Personally I see this as a great capability but also realize that there will be some gotchas. Specifically in that when a Group is created, an Exchange Distribution list is created. This is helpful since you’re able to have message traffic sent to this address. However if you think about the use case where a Group is deleted and the users fail to realize that the e-mail address that they received notifications on now no longer exists, there may be problems for end users.

Additionally it should be noted per the configuration documentation that an Azure AD Premium license is required to implement Office 365 Group Expiration – if you don’t have these they’re available at a per user cost and have several benefits in addition to this.

All in all, definitely an exciting feature and functionality but wondering how things will work for organizations where end users are truly business users that don’t quite understand all the components of an Office 365 Group or what the information lifecycle truly is…

Categories
Azure Cloud

Azure QuickStart Templates

If you’re like me you prefer to automate things as much as possible. In some instances that means using desired state configuration, in other instances it’s launching a series of PowerShell scripts. This saves time and helps to ensure a configuration that’s repeatable and easy to kick off without a ton of work – yes there are parameters that occasionally you have to set (e.g., passwords, IP addresses, etc.).

Enter into the mix that this helps to an extent. Then you start looking at Azure and the Resource Management templates and you realize that you can automate a good chunk of these operations… of course this means that you go out and quickly learn JSON so that you’re able to create your own.

Newsflash – there are quick start templates that Microsoft already has out there for you to use. That’s right, community driven and for the most part Microsoft supported. Where do you find them you might ask? Well if you use a search engine of your choice (Google, Bing, Yahoo, Duck Duck Go) you’ll probably find them rather quickly, but for your convenience they’re also here – https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/resources/templates/

The templates can be launched directly from the template pages into an Azure subscription or if you find that you want to use these as a starting point, you can open the GitHub repo that’s associated with the templates, fork it and modify it to your hearts desire.

Bottom line? Don’t ignore these resources. You’ll occasionally run into a bug when a template references an older version of an Azure disk image, but to get around that just identify the issue and put in a pull request for the group that maintains that particular QuickStart template to update it.

Categories
Community Conference

Northern Virginia Code Camp 2015

This coming weekend on 18 April 2015, the Northern Virginia Code Camp will be hosting it’s Spring event at the Reston Microsoft Technology Center with 30 speakers covering various aspects of development across several different technologies and platforms.

The session listing is available here: http://www.novacodecamp.org/Sessions.aspx

If you’re interested in registering for the event, you can do so by hoping over to the registration site here: http://www.nvite.com/novacc15/edda

If you’re interested in updates about the Northern Virginia Code Camp, follow their twitter handle yonder under the name of @novacodecamp

Definitely worth your time on a Saturday morning to learn something new, network with others in the technology community and gather perspective on different ways of approaching technology problems.

Categories
Cloud

Microsoft Azure – PowerShell March 2015 Update

Without much fanfare, the Azure PowerShell commandlets have been updated as of 31 March 2015 to version 0.8.16. More pertaining to the update can be read here:
https://github.com/Azure/azure-powershell/releases/tag/v0.8.16-March2015

If you’ve been watching the Azure Content repo on GitHub you probably noticed a ton of things pertaining to HDInsight being committed. Well, you guessed it, there are a lot of new additions when it comes to Azure HDInsight, specifically on Linux when to provide:
– Support for creating, deleting, listing, and submitting jobs to HDInsight clusters with Linux Operating System.

Additionally there are several additions to the Azure Insights (Operational Insights in this case I believe) to include the following:
– Added cmdlets
– Add-AutoscaleSetting
– Get-AutoScaleHistory
– Get-AutoScaleSetting
– New-AutoScaleProfile
– New-AutoScaleRule
– Remove-AutoscaleSetting
– Get-Metrics
– Get-MetricDefinitions
– Format-MetricsAsTable

If you haven’t clicked on the link at the top yet, head on over to the Web Platform Installer or the Windows Standalone installer to get moving forward with the 0.8.16 build of the Azure PowerShell commandlets.

Also, if you’re using Visual Studio, there was a point release update to version 2.5.1 that might be of interest to you – .NET SDK for Visual Studio.

Happy PoShing!

Categories
Azure Office 365 Podcast

Brewery FM – Episode 7 – Delving About Delve… Again

MemeGenerator BreweryFMThis week has been a little hectic between work, life and community, but somehow Scott Hoag and I were still able to get together for an hour and record another session of Brewery.fm.

In this weeks episode, we call out Tim Ferro again – mostly because he asked us for some thoughts on an announcement from the Office 365 team on Azure ExpressRoute. Further, we discussed the intricacies of Azure’s RBAC features that were released a few months back (and how PowerShell is still the better way to implement RBAC if you need it with Azure) as well as a whole lot of other interesting topics.

If you’re not subscribed to the Podcast yet, point your favourite podcast software (whether that be iTunes, Podcast Lounge, DownCast, PocketCasts or OverCast over at our feed:

Brewery.fm Pub feed

Once you’ve done that, if you’re curious about something we mentioned, perhaps you should check out the show notes that Scott pulls together and publishes at http://www.brewery.fm each week with the specific episodes. If you want to get to a specific episode quickly, just use the link shortener pattern of http://pub.brewery.fm/breweryXXX where XXX refers to the episode number. This week would be http://pub.brewery.fm/brewery007.

As always, if you’ve got feedback for the show, ping us on Twitter at @breweryfm, leave a post on FaceBook or send us an e-mail at info@brewery.fm.

Oh and we double dog dare you to give us a rating on iTunes… come on you know you wanna 🙂

Needless to say, lots of exciting news in this episode! Quick download it now!

Categories
Certification

Microsoft Learning Roadmap Updated

4762.MSL_CertificationPathways_Commercial_2015.png-550x0Just in case you didn’t catch this notice on the Microsoft Learning blog, thought I’d post it up as a reminder (and so that I could find it more easily later on… :)) Microsoft Learning has updated their learning roadmap to show the MCSE and MCSD certification tracks to provide technology professionals and developers with a more concrete planning tool. It depicts the exams needed to get to the different designations and provides the framework to assist in figuring out what’s next and how things build upon one another.
It also includes some of the information pertaining to the three new Azure exams – note that they’re not a part of an MCSE / MCSD training path… yet. It wouldn’t surprise me to see that change in the next year or two based on the way that Microsoft seems to be going more toward services where Azure is the service delivery platform.

For more on the learning roadmap, check out the blog post from MSL here – https://borntolearn.mslearn.net/b/weblog/archive/2015/01/30/updated-certification-roadmap-now-available

Best of all you can download the Learning Roadmap and print it off on a plotter and cover a wall with it, maybe make a game out of it with your colleagues to show where everyone is at and have a friendly competition. 🙂