Categories
Office 365

Office 365 Dedicated – SLAs and SDs updated…

Microsoft has published an update for their Office 365 Dedicated Service Level Agreements and Service Descriptions. If you’re not working with an Office 365 Dedicated client, but are instead working with an OnPremise deployment these documents provide a great starting point when defining your O&M strategy as well as helping to define processes and service level agreements.

For instance, the Custom Solutions Developers Guide for Office 365 Dedicated provides an outline that can be used for onPremise deployments in terms of areas that need to be considered for developers to operate within. That’s not to say that there isn’t greater flexibility in developing full trust farm solutions for your SharePoint implementation, but it is to say that Microsoft has invested significant cycles to put together this guide among other documentation that helps to think through the entire process.

If your client is however looking to go to Office 365 Dedicated – definitely need to become familiar with the information housed within this set of documents available here:
Microsoft Office 365 Service Descriptions and Service Level Agreements for Dedicated Subscription Plans

Categories
Migration Office 365

Office 365 Dedicated – Content Migration

Interestingly enough, but if you’re using SharePoint Online in Office 365 in a dedicated environment there are opportunities for content migration from onPrem to the cloud by providing copies of content databases to Microsoft. Or at least you used to have that option as described in this document:

SharePoint Online Content Migration Policy – Office 365 Dedicated Plans – January 2013 – http://download.microsoft.com/download/0/4/0/04054360-DC5E-4AB8-B3AB-6BF01BB3946C/SharePoint%20Online%20Content%20Migration%20Policy_Office%20365%20Dedicated%20Plans_Jan%202013.docx

If you’re looking to have a backup copy of your data perhaps or looking to move off of Office 365 Dedicated, the cut off for having content databases pushed out of Microsoft’s system is 15 April 2013 as stated in the documentation:

Starting April 15, 2013, Microsoft will no longer process outbound migrations for SharePoint Online dedicated plan customers. Outbound migrations will instead be accomplished by third-party independent software vendor (ISV) solutions, just like Inbound migrations are today.

Microsoft states that they are doing this for a number of reasons to include:

ISVs provide an effective solution for migrating content out of your SharePoint Online farm, just like for inbound migrations. Using an ISV solution has the following benefits:

  • Reduces technical requirements and complexity involved in successfully attaching the data to an on-premises SharePoint farm.
  • Frees up customer change windows for deployment of configuration changes and custom solutions.
  • Removes the risk and inconvenience of a USB drive shipment.

For information about using ISV solutions for content migration, see the SharePoint Online Content Migration by Third-Party Solutions Policy document, available to customers on the Customer Extranet site.

Overall the document is an interesting read regarding the SharePoint Online 2010 Dedicated service offering that is a component of Office 365 and outbound data migrations. Just remember however that you do have an impending deadline in April if you wish to utilize Microsoft’s outbound data migration service.

Categories
Cloud Office 365

Office 365 and Lync for Mac

Recently I started doing a little usability testing of SharePoint Online within Office 365 with my MacBook Pro running Mac OSX Lion (10.7.3) and figured, “While I’m here, why not pop open the Lync client to be able to keep in touch with colleagues working on solutions?”
So I double tapped the command button to bring up Alfred and typed in “Ly” to bring up the Lync client.

So once the Lync client was up and looking pretty on my screen, I put in my credentials, figuring that my e-mail address and user ID were probably both my e-mail address. So I clicked “Sign In” and spin baby spin… the color wheel of Appledom went forth to conquer, only to sit and time out, not connecting, not discovery the SIP server of Microsoft’s Lync servers, not allowing me to find my connected colleagues. I sat and wondered, “Strange, my Windows Lync client discovers Office 365’s Lync servers, albeit it takes a little while, but it finds them, why can’t the Mac client?”

First things first – yes, I’m using my own domain name entry that’s redirected the DNS Name Servers to Microsoft’s so as to let them handle the DNS components.
Second thing – yes I’ve got Microsoft Office 11 running with Service Pack 2 and I’ve loaded the Office 365 sign-in tool to assist with some of the login.

So back on the ranch… while sitting there waiting for a while I wondered, “Is this a known bug, did I forget to read an FAQ?” The answer would be yes, I missed the memo.

Microsoft has a nice little article on the Downloads page for Mac software from Office 365 that points to this article:
Set up Lync for Mac 2011 for Office 365 – http://onlinehelp.microsoft.com/en-us/office365-smallbusinesses/hh534384.aspx

Basically it details the following:
Use your e-mail address / Cloud ID for both the User ID and the E-mail Address.
Click on Advanced and then put in the Microsoft Lync internal and external server settings as:
sipdir.online.lync.com:443
Go back to the sign in page and click sign in and you’re good to go.

Wondering why it is that the Mac Lync client can’t perform discovery while the Windows version can without any configuration… granted, the autodiscovery process for the Windows client seems to take a while… perhaps it’s time to do this on the Windows client for zippy login?